Tuesday, July 15, 2008

SVN url changes & a funny video

For those that care, our SVN urls have changed due to a migration. The repositories are the same, but the URLS different:

Developer URL: https://svn.jboss.org/repos/labs/labs/jbossrules/trunk/
Anonymous URL: http://anonsvn.jboss.org/repos/labs/labs/jbossrules/trunk/

If you have an existing working copy, you can use svn switch like following:

svn switch --relocate https://svn.labs.jboss.org/labs/jbossrules/trunk https://svn.jboss.org/repos/labs/labs/jbossrules/trunk .

(for developers).

Also, some may remember I mentioned Fair Isaac's "falcon" fraud detection system some time ago - which is in use by ANZ bank. I finally found the advertisement for this, I always think it is funny:



What is interesting is that they are promoting a fraud detection system as a strategic advantage,

7 comments:

  1. that's a funny commercial. From past experience, that is a standard rule for catching simple types of fraud. The harder type of fraud is small charges to businesses the customer uses. For example, say bob likes starbucks. A criminal uses the card to buy drinks at starbucks.

    Fraud systems have a hard time catching this type of activity, since a regular business rule doesn't understand the user's larger pattern. For example, say bob always gets a coffee in the morning and one around sunset. The criminal always charges around noon. For a system to catch this type of activity, it would need to know what the customer does on a regular basis. This means generating a meta profile for the user, comparing the charges and calculating the likelihood as a statistical value.

    I like Paul Haley's blog about the shift to statistical methods for fraud detection.

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  2. The "Falcon" is really just a bunch of DBAs in the basement running some SQL scripts. ANZ are in the process of replacing it with Oracle BI

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  3. @aaron I *know* they use Falcon from FI, so unless they paid millions to throw it out instead for SQL, I don't think that could be the case ;)

    Besides, any SQL or BI database would be too out of date for CC fraud detection (for forensics, it is fine).

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  4. If they "really" are using falcon, it's not a bunch of offline SQL. FI has been in the fraud detection market since the mid 90's. The technology came out of UC San Diego I believe, I could be wrong.

    Some firms do use SQL queries for fraud detection, but that's terrible inefficient and isn't realtime. I don't know how many business use Falcon, but I do know it is popular in the past.

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  5. If this command doesn't make an "svn up" work:

    svn switch --relocate https://svn.labs.jboss.org/labs/jbossrules/trunk https://svn.jboss.org/repos/labs/labs/jbossrules/trunk

    Try this one:

    svn switch --relocate https://svn.labs.jboss.com/labs/jbossrules/trunk https://svn.jboss.org/repos/labs/labs/jbossrules/trunk

    because you probably checked it out from jboss.com instead of jboss.org

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  6. I saw your video of credit card fraud protection.It is very funny but attractive.You are provide the best services in your area.

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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