Sunday, July 20, 2014

jBPM6 Developer Guide coming out soon!

Hello everyone. This post is just to let you know that jBPM6 Developer Guide is about to get published, and you can pre-order it from here and get from a 20% to a 37% discount on your order! With this book, you can learn how to:
  • Model and implement different business processes using the BPMN2 standard notation
  • Understand how and when to use the different tools provided by the JBoss Business Process Management (BPM) platform
  • Learn how to model complex business scenarios and environments through a step-by-step approach
Here you can find a list of what you will find in each chapter:  

Chapter 1, Why Do We Need Business Process Management?, introduces the BPM discipline. This chapter will provide the basis for the rest of the book, by providing an understanding of why and how the jBPM6 project has been designed, and the path its evolution will follow.  
Chapter 2, BPM Systems Structure, goes in depth into understanding what the main pieces and components inside a Business Process Management System (BPMS) are. This chapter introduces the concept of BPMS as the natural follow up of an understanding of the BPM discipline. The reader will find a deep and technical explanation about how a BPM system core can be built from scratch and how it will interact with the rest of the components in the BPMS infrastructure. This chapter also describes the intimate relationship between the Drools and jBPM projects, which is one of the key advantages of jBPM6 in comparison with all the other BPMSs, as well as existing methodologies where a BPMS connects with other systems.
Chapter 3, Using BPMN 2.0 to Model Business Scenarios, covers the main constructs used to model our business processes, guiding the reader through an example that illustrates the most useful modeling patterns. The BPMN 2.0 specification has become the de facto standard for modeling executable business processes since it was released in early 2011, and is recommended to any BPM implementation, even outside the scope of jBPM6.  
Chapter 4, Understanding the Knowledge Is Everything Workbench, takes a look into the tooling provided by the jBPM6 project, which will enable the reader to both define new processes and configure a runtime to execute those processes. The overall architecture of the tooling provided will be covered as well in this chapter.
Chapter 5, Creating a Process Project in the KIE Workbench, dives into the required steps to create a process definition with the existing tooling, as well as to test it and run it. The BPMN 2.0 specification will be put into practice as the reader creates an executable process and a compiled project where the runtime specifications will be defined.
Chapter 6, Human Interactions, covers in depth the Human Task component inside jBPM6. A big feature of BPMS is the capability to coordinate human and system interactions. It also describes how the existing tooling builds a user interface using the concepts of task lists and task forms, exposing the end users involved in the execution of multiple process definitions’ tasks to a common interface.
Chapter 7, Defining Your Environment with the Runtime Manager, covers the different strategies provided to configure an environment to run our processes. The reader will see the configurations for connecting external systems, human task components, persistence strategies and the relation a specific process execution will have with an environment, as well as methods to define their own custom runtime configuration.
Chapter 8, Implementing Persistence and Transactions, covers the shared mechanisms between the Drools and jBPM projects used to store information and define transaction boundaries. When we want to support processes that coordinate systems and people over long periods of time, we need to understand how the process information can be persisted.  
Chapter 9, Integration with other Knowledge Definitions, gives a brief introduction to the Drools Rule Engine. It is used to mix business processes with business rules, to define advanced and complex scenarios. Also, we cover Drools Fusion, and added feature of the Drools Rule Engine to add the ability of temporal reasoning, allowing business processes to be monitored, improved and covered by business scenarios that require temporal inferences.  
Chapter 10, KIE Workbench Integration with External Systems, describes the ways in which the provided tooling can be extended with extra features, along with a description of all the different extension points provided by the API and exposed by the tooling. A set of good practices is described in order to give the reader a comprehensive way to deal with different scenarios a BPMS will likely face.
Appendix A, The UberFire Framework, goes into detail about the based utility framework used by the KIE Workbench to define its user interface. The reader will learn the structure and use of the framework, along with a demonstration that will enable the extension of any component in the workbench distribution you choose. Hope you like it! Cheers,